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Great ad from Nike starring current time world champion, following his campaign Write the Future (Write the Future).

Nike did not miss the selection of Holland and decided to do a tribute:

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Refait” is a remake of the football World Cup match between France and Germany (Seville, Spain, 1982). Shot by Pied La Biche in Villeurbanne (France), every aspect of the fifteen last minutes of the match was carefully reconstructed : players, positions, gestures, intensity, drama etc. It consists in shifting the traditional game area into the urban environment. Each sequence takes place in one or several locations and then the city temporarily becomes the lab for unsual experiments.
The soundtrack is made up of the original commentaries mixed with interviews of the audience recorded during the shooting.

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Watch the production process of the official 2010 World Cup match ball Jabulani. All Official Match Balls for the 2010 FIFA World Cup have the same weight and the same circumference and are therefore always the same size. Production capacity for the Official Match Ball for South Africa: 1760 balls per day. Production has been running since April 2009.

The commercial titled “Kick” was done by DDB CHICAGO advertising agency for BEER (BUDWEISER company) in USA. It was released in the June 2010.

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The strange noise you’re hearing during today’s World Cup games (and for the rest of the tournament, presumably) is the sound of thousands of vuvuzelas. But what, pray tell, is a vuvuzela?

A vuvuzela is a long plastic horn popular with South African soccer fans, who blow them en masse during games. Played by producing a ‘raspberry’ sound with your lips, the vuvuzelas’ sound has been compared to an elephant’s trumpet, a dying goat and a car going over rumble strips.

The horns first came into fashion in the mid-1990s, but their origin is unclear.

FIFA originally considered banning the vuvuzelas in the run-up to the World Cup, after scientists warned of hearing damage among the spectators and both players and announcers expressed fears they would drowned out by the trumpets’ drone. South African officials eventually convinced FIFA to drop the proposed ban, arguing that they were an essential part of the South African soccer experience. (Vuvuzelas longer than 1 meter remain off-limits.)
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“Goooooogle” graphic with the more appropriate “Gooooooal!” change.

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Credits:
Advertising School: Willem de Kooning Academie, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Creatives: Bas van de Poel, Daan van Dam
Photographer: Milan Daniels

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